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New Research Links Music Study and Increased Brain Size New   research   findings   that   show   playing   a   musical   instrument   increases   the   size   of   the   sound-processing area   of   the   brain   were   published   in   the April   23   issue   of   Nature   magazine.   Neuroscientist   Christo   Pantev   and colleagues   at   the   University   of   Muenster   in   Germany   used   magnetic   source   imaging   to   compare   the   brains of   skilled   musicians   and   people   who   have   never   played   a   musical   note.   They   discovered   that   the   musicians' auditory   cortex,   which   responds   to   pitching   a   sound   on   a   piano,   was   about   25   percent   larger   than   their   non- musical   counterparts.   The   researchers   also   found   that   the   younger   the   musicians   began   their   training,   the more the cortex developed. Pantev   told   the   Reuters   News   Service   in   April   that   the   brain   processes   acoustic   stimuli,   such   as   musical notes   on   a   piano,   as   so-called   tonotopic   maps.   Neurones--cells   that   transmit   nerve   impulses--   are   grouped together   on   the   maps   in   the   brain   according   to   pitch.   But   because   musical   tones   are   different   from   ordinary sounds, more neurons are needed to process the more complicated notes. A   musician's   training   develops   the   area   of   the   brain   in   a   different   way.   More   neurones   are   involved   and   are working    more    harmoniously,    which    Pantev    said    could    explain    how    young    musicians    develop    such extraordinary talent. The more experienced musicians had larger tonotopic maps. The   study   supports   earlier   research   that   showed   a   difference   in   the   part   of   the   brain   controlling   the   left   and right   hand   fingers   of   string   musicians.   "We   found   that   the   representation   of   the   fingers   of   the   left   hand   are bigger than the representation of the fingers of the right hand," Pantev told Reuters. Music makes us smarter According   to   research   conducted   at   the   University   of   California   at   Irvine.   The   positive   effect   of   music   has been   understood   for   a   long   time.   Plato   once   said   that   music   "is   a   more   potent   instrument   than   any   other   for education." Now scientists know why. According   to   Newsweek   magazine,   music   trains   the   brain   for   higher   forms   of   thinking.   Researchers   at   the UCI   studied   three   year   olds   and   found   that   after   taking   piano   lessons   and   choir   for   8   months,   they   became expert puzzle makers, scoring 80% higher than their playmates did in spatial intelligence. "Early   music   training   can   enhance   a   child's   ability   to   reason'"   says   Irvine   physicist   Gordon   Shaw. According to   researchers   these   skills   later   translate   into   complex   math   and   engineering   skills.   Shaw   believes   that   as children   listen   to   classical   music   they   exercise   their   cortical   neurons,   which   also   strengthens   circuits   used   for higher-order   thinking   skills.   Einstein,   who   was   a   violinist,   speaking   about   his   theory   of   relativity   said,   "it occurred   to   me   by   intuition,   and   music   was   the   driving   force   behind   that   intuition.   The   discovery   was   the result of musical perception." For more information check out the UCI web site : http://www.musica.uci.edu Your Brain on Music Ongoing research shows that classical music is good for the brain: The   cerebellum   is   larger   in   classically   trained   musicians   than   in   people   who   don't   play   a   musical   instrument, Dr.    Gottfried    Schlaug    of    Beth    Israel    Deaconess    Medical    Center    in    Boston    reported    at    the    Society    of Neuroscience   convention   in   1998.   The   cerebellum   is   a   region   of   the   brain   responsible   for   posture,   balance, coordination and fine motor movements. Research   pursued   at   the   University   of   California   ,   Irvine   ,   led   by   psychologist   Frances   Rauscher,   Ph.D,   and neuroscientist   Gordon   Shaw,   Ph.D.,   shows   that   there   is   "an   unmistakable   causal   link   between   music   and spatial   intelligence,   reversing   the   once   commonly   held   view   that   music   education   is   irrelevant   to   intellectual development." In   this   study   in   the   mid-1990s,   researchers   concluded   that   spatial-reasoning   abilities   are   crucial   for   such higher   brain   function   such   as   music,   complex   mathematics   and   chess.   Results   showed   that   the   spatial- reasoning   performance   of   18   preschool   children   who   took   eight   months   of   music   lessons   far   exceeded   the spatial   reasoning   of   a   demographically   comparable   group   of   15   preschool   children   who   went   without   music lessons. A   similar   study   in   the   late   '90s   by   Shaw   and   Rauscher   showed   that   children   who   received   piano   training performed    34    percent    higher    on    tests    measuring    spatial    temporal    ability    than    children    instructed    in computers. "It    has    been    clearly    documented    that    young    students    have    difficulty    understanding    the    concepts    of proportion   (used   in   math   and   science)   and   that   no   successful   program   has   been   developed   to   teach   these concepts   in   the   school   system.   The   high   proportion   of   children   who   saw   dramatic   improvements   in   spatial- temporal   reasoning   as   a   result   of   musical   training   should   be   of   great   interest   to   scientists   and   educators," the research team noted. Students   who   study   music   scored   higher   on   both   the   verbal   and   math   portions   of   the   SAT   than   did   non- music students, according to the College Entrance Examination Boards, as reported in Symphony, 1996.
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©2018 The Music School, Inc.
New    Research    Links    Music    Study    and    Increased Brain Size New    research    findings    that    show    playing    a    musical    instrument increases   the   size   of   the   sound-processing   area   of   the   brain   were published   in   the   April   23   issue   of   Nature   magazine.   Neuroscientist Christo   Pantev   and   colleagues   at   the   University   of   Muenster   in Germany   used   magnetic   source   imaging   to   compare   the   brains   of skilled   musicians   and   people   who   have   never   played   a   musical note.   They   discovered   that   the   musicians'   auditory   cortex,   which responds   to   pitching   a   sound   on   a   piano,   was   about   25   percent larger   than   their   non-musical   counterparts.   The   researchers   also found   that   the   younger   the   musicians   began   their   training,   the   more the cortex developed. Pantev    told    the    Reuters    News    Service    in    April    that    the    brain processes   acoustic   stimuli,   such   as   musical   notes   on   a   piano,   as so-called    tonotopic    maps.    Neurones--cells    that    transmit    nerve impulses--   are   grouped   together   on   the   maps   in   the   brain   according to    pitch.    But    because    musical    tones    are    different    from    ordinary sounds,     more     neurons     are     needed     to     process     the     more complicated notes. A   musician's   training   develops   the   area   of   the   brain   in   a   different way.     More     neurones     are     involved     and     are     working     more harmoniously,     which     Pantev     said     could     explain     how     young musicians develop such extraordinary talent. The more experienced musicians had larger tonotopic maps. The   study   supports   earlier   research   that   showed   a   difference   in   the part   of   the   brain   controlling   the   left   and   right   hand   fingers   of   string musicians.   "We   found   that   the   representation   of   the   fingers   of   the left   hand   are   bigger   than   the   representation   of   the   fingers   of   the right hand," Pantev told Reuters. Music makes us smarter According   to   research   conducted   at   the   University   of   California   at Irvine.   The   positive   effect   of   music   has   been   understood   for   a   long time.   Plato   once   said   that   music   "is   a   more   potent   instrument   than any other for education." Now scientists know why. According   to   Newsweek   magazine,   music   trains   the   brain   for   higher forms   of   thinking.   Researchers   at   the   UCI   studied   three   year   olds and   found   that   after   taking   piano   lessons   and   choir   for   8   months, they   became   expert   puzzle   makers,   scoring   80%   higher   than   their playmates did in spatial intelligence. "Early   music   training   can   enhance   a   child's   ability   to   reason'"   says Irvine   physicist   Gordon   Shaw. According   to   researchers   these   skills later    translate    into    complex    math    and    engineering    skills.    Shaw believes   that   as   children   listen   to   classical   music   they   exercise   their cortical   neurons,   which   also   strengthens   circuits   used   for   higher- order   thinking   skills.   Einstein,   who   was   a   violinist,   speaking   about his   theory   of   relativity   said,   "it   occurred   to   me   by   intuition,   and music   was   the   driving   force   behind   that   intuition. The   discovery   was the result of musical perception." For      more      information      check      out      the      UCI      web      site      : http://www.musica.uci.edu Your Brain on Music Ongoing research shows that classical music is good for the brain: The   cerebellum   is   larger   in   classically   trained   musicians   than   in people   who   don't   play   a   musical   instrument,   Dr.   Gottfried   Schlaug of   Beth   Israel   Deaconess   Medical   Center   in   Boston   reported   at   the Society   of   Neuroscience   convention   in   1998.   The   cerebellum   is   a region   of   the   brain   responsible   for   posture,   balance,   coordination and fine motor movements. Research   pursued   at   the   University   of   California   ,   Irvine   ,   led   by psychologist   Frances   Rauscher,   Ph.D,   and   neuroscientist   Gordon Shaw,    Ph.D.,    shows    that    there    is    "an    unmistakable    causal    link between     music     and     spatial     intelligence,     reversing     the     once commonly   held   view   that   music   education   is   irrelevant   to   intellectual development." In   this   study   in   the   mid-1990s,   researchers   concluded   that   spatial- reasoning   abilities   are   crucial   for   such   higher   brain   function   such   as music,   complex   mathematics   and   chess.   Results   showed   that   the spatial-reasoning   performance   of   18   preschool   children   who   took eight   months   of   music   lessons   far   exceeded   the   spatial   reasoning of   a   demographically   comparable   group   of   15   preschool   children who went without music lessons. A   similar   study   in   the   late   '90s   by   Shaw   and   Rauscher   showed   that children   who   received   piano   training   performed   34   percent   higher on   tests   measuring   spatial   temporal   ability   than   children   instructed in computers. "It   has   been   clearly   documented   that   young   students   have   difficulty understanding    the    concepts    of    proportion    (used    in    math    and science)   and   that   no   successful   program   has   been   developed   to teach   these   concepts   in   the   school   system.   The   high   proportion   of children    who    saw    dramatic    improvements    in    spatial-temporal reasoning   as   a   result   of   musical   training   should   be   of   great   interest to scientists and educators," the research team noted. Students   who   study   music   scored   higher   on   both   the   verbal   and math   portions   of   the   SAT   than   did   non-music   students,   according   to the     College     Entrance     Examination     Boards,     as     reported     in Symphony, 1996.
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